Asian Lacquer Craft Exchange Program, in Chiang Mai, 2016

<< Exhibition and Performance

20 February, 2016
Lectures : 9:30〜12:30, Auditorium

21 February, 2016
Demonstrations : 10.00~12:00, Exhibition Space
Workshops : 13:00~15:00, Exhibition Space

Support :The Japan Foundation Asia Center, Consulate-General of Japan in Chiang Mai,
Organizers:Chiang Mai University, Asian Lacquer Craft Exchange Research Project

1-Lectures
20 February 9:30〜12:30, Auditorium, Chiang Mai University Art Center
9:30 - Opening Remarks
Avorn Opatpatanakit Ph.D, Associate Professor, Vice President for Research and Academic Services, Chiang Mai University
Thitipol Kanteewong, Assistant Professor, Assistant Dean for International Relations, Chiang Mai University
Mr. Hisao Horikoshi, Consul, The Consulate-General of Japan in Chiang Mai

9:45 - The Asian Lacquer Craft Exchange Research Project
Sakurako Matsushima, Director, Asian Lacquer Craft Exchange Research Project

9:50 - Keynote Lecture
“Lanan-Thai Lacquer”, Vithi Panichapan, Lacquer Expert, Chiang Mai University
History of Chiang Mai Lacquerware from past to present. The revival of Lanna Lacquer production and techniques in Chiang Mai. The influence of tradition and culture on Chiang Mai lacquerware and its features. The Lacquerware trade between Chiang Mai - central Thailand and the mass tourism business in the period of declining lacquerware production.

”Japanese Lacquer – Maki-e and Raden”, Norihiko Ogura, Professor, Tokyo University of the Arts
“Maki-e” is the traditional Japanese decorative technique of sprinkling gold or silver powder on lacquerware. First, urushi (lacquer) is applied to the areas to be decorated and then the powder is sprinkled over these areas before the urushi hardens. Maki-e technique was originally developed in Japan and has 1300-year history.
“Raden” is another decorative technique in which linings of mother-of-pearl, abalone, or great green turban shells are cut into designs and either put onto or inserted into the lacquered surface.
Prof. Ogura talked about several maki-e and raden decorative techniques.

10:50-11:00 – Tea Break

11:00-12:30 – Lectures
”Lacquer Art in Cambodia, China, Myanmar, Taiwan, and Vietnam”: Eric Stocker, Qiao Jia, Malar Win Maung, Andrew Shih-Ming, Saeko Ando, and Trinh Tuan

Current State of Lacquer in Cambodia, Eric Stocker
Historically, Cambodia had a thriving lacquer industry and culture. But it was lost in the upheavals of recent times. However today, lacquer trees are being tapped and lacquerware using natural vegetal lacquer is being made. There has been a rebirth of lacquer culture in Cambodia.

Current State of Lacquer Craft in China, Qiao Jia
Lacquer has long been a part of China’s history and culture. Contemporary lacquer arts have been affected by the vast changes in China since 1949, especially by rapid economic growth. Lacquer painting and arts are now taught at art schools and universities. But traditional lacquer craft industries have suffered under economic pressures and the use of natural lacquer has fallen out of favor. However, a new generation of artists is returning to traditional methods to create new directions in lacquer arts.

Lacquer in Myanmar, Malar Win Maung
Lacquerware is widely used in daily life. Bagan is the main production center, but other areas, while in decline, still produce modest amounts. Bagan lacquerware is of high quality due to tourism and competition. Adjusting to the changes in lifestyles and tastes that rapid modernization brings is the major challenge facing the industry. Modern designs and new uses for lacquer are needed for domestic and international markets.

The Development and Peculiarities of Lacquer Art in Modern Taiwan, Andrew Shih-Ming Pai
Taiwanese urushi techniques were influenced by other countries in the region, for example, Japan and China. Historically, Taiwanese craftsmen used many urushi techniques, including chinkin, heap lacquer, carved lacquer color urushi, eggshell, shell inlay, and kawarinuri. The best known Taiwanese technique is pon-lai tou, the use of colored urushi on wood carving. Today at school, we combine urushi with many mediums, including pottery, glass, and leather.

The value of Vietnamese lacquer arts and our effort and strategy to preserve and promote it, Trinh Tuan / Saeko Ando
Though Vietnamese lacquer crafts boasts quite long history, we can’t deny the lack of strong characteristics. Since there are obvious influences by their Chinese counterparts, people even question whether their lacquer techniques have been originated within the country or they are introduced from China. In early 20th Century, Son Mai painting invented at the École supérieure des beaux-arts de l'Indochine created a whole new image of Vietnamese lacquer art.
We would like to share the secrets why this new form of art has flourished so much in this country.
In recent years, Vietnam’s economy has dramatically developed and people’s lifestyle has changed. They care less about traditional products and prefer “short life” products. Cheap lacquer products are mass produced with shorter and faster process, which downgrades the artistic values of the lacquer products including lacquer paintings. On the other hand, there are numbers of artists and artisans who continuously develop and explore beauty of Vietnamese lacquer art. The Government also supports these efforts by funding conferences and lacquer exhibitions both national and international.

“Exhibitions and Lacquerware Collections in Wajima Museum of Urushi Art”, Aiko Terao, Curator of Wajima Museum of Urushi Art, Ishikawa Prefecture
The Wajima Museum of Urushi Art in Ishikawa Prefecture was established in 1991 in Wajima, a leading lacquerware production center. This is one of the few museums that specialize in lacquer. The Museum gathers information about lacquerware from Japan and abroad and provides exhibition space where lacquerware can be appreciated. Curator Terao will report on the Museum’s lacquerware collection and some of its exhibitions from Japan and other Asian countries: Thailand, Myanmar, Bhutan, Vietnam, China and Korea.

“The Influence of Japanese Lacquer Craft on European Imitation Lacquer -“Japanese style” as Seen in Changes in Imitation Lacquer by Country & Era”, Yoshie Itani, Project Professor, Global Support Center, Tokyo University of the Arts
Japanese lacquerware, which began being exported to Europe in the 16th Century, was very popular with the ruling classes and other wealthy people. Western artisans imitated Japanese lacquerware, but also developed their own styles. Professor Itani discusses this phenomenon.
Current: Project Professor, Global Support Center, Tokyo University of the Arts

2-Demonstrations
21 February, 10:00~12:00, Exhibition Space, Chiang Mai University Art Center
Moderator: Sumanatsya Voharn and Meviga Han-Gla

・Japanese Lacquer Technique “Maki-e and Raden” 10:00~10:30
Norihiko Ogura, Professor, Tokyo University of the Arts
There are several types of maki-e technique including hira-maki-e, taka-maki-e, and togidashi-maki-e. In togidashi-maki-e, the design is drawn in urushi (lacquer), and gold or silver powder is sprinkled over it. After the urushi has hardened, another coat is applied on the design. When this coat has hardened, it is burnished lightly with charcoal and water until the gold powder is faintly revealed. Professor Norihiko Ogura demonstrated this process as well as raden (shell inlay) technique.


・Thai Lacquer Technique “Lai Kam Lanna” 10:30~11:00
Lipikorn Makeaw, Assistance Professor, Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna
“Lai Kam Lanna” is gold leaf incised technique in Lanna Thai. This technique is also used in the Shan State, and Laos in temple decoration. First apply lacquer on the surface then wipe lacquer out and placed gold leaf over all the surface. Then using the sharp iron tool drawing the design motif to remove the gold leaf out. Finally the black lacquer motif appear with gold background. Assistance Professor Lipikorn Makaew demonstrated these techniques.


・Thai Lacquer Technique “Chiang Mai incised technique” 11:00~11:30
Somboon Reandee and Duangkamol Chaikampan, local artisans
“Chiang Mai incised technique” is called “lai kud” or “hai dok”. In Myanmar it is called “kanyit”, and in Japan “kinma”. First, a design is engraved on the lacquerware using a sharp iron stylus. Then colored lacquer such as cinnabar is applied. After rubbing gently, the color remains in the engraved design. Then a final coating of clear lacquer is applied. Ms. Somboon Reandee and Ms. Duangkamol Chaikampan demonstrated this technique.

3-Workshops
21 February, 13:00~15:00, Exhibition Space, Chiang Mai University Art Center
Moderator: Sumanatsya Voharn and Meviga Han-Gla

・Japanese Lacquer Technique “Maki-e”
Norihiko Ogura, Professor, Tokyo University of the Arts,
“Maki-e” is the traditional Japanese decorative technique of sprinkling gold or silver powder on lacquerware. First, urushi (lacquer) is applied to the areas to be decorated and then the powder is sprinkled over these areas before the urushi hardens. In this workshop, simple maki-e technique was practiced on 30 x 45 mm round pendant shapes.

・Thai Lacquer technique “Lai Kam Lanna”
Lipikorn Makeaw, Assistance Professor, Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna
“Lai Kam Lanna” is a gold leaf stenciling technique used in Lanna Thai, the Shan State in Myanmar, and Laos. First designs are created on paper and then cut into stencils. The paper stencil is then placed over a lacquered surface and gold leaf applied. The gold leaf easily adheres to the pre-lacquered surface. In this workshop, “Lai Kam Lanna” technique was practiced on 120 x 140 mm black board.

Each workshop was limited to 20 participants.


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